Proven Tips to Mastering Impact of COVID-19 on the Non-Profit Sector

The coronavirus pandemic has influenced worldwide activities and lifestyle, both positively and negatively. Therefore, organisations, including the non-profit sector, are influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this way, NGOs have to maintain their volunteers, donors, employees, and beneficiaries directly touched by the pandemic situation. The non-profit sector is facing different obstacles, and at the same time, benefitting from COVID-19. However, they must work and deal with the impacts and find solutions to reassure their community during this pandemic.

Continue reading “Proven Tips to Mastering Impact of COVID-19 on the Non-Profit Sector”

YUVA lobbies to change appellation of ‘NGO’ to ‘CSO’

YUVA believes that the appellation of NGOs should change from “Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO)” to “Civil Society Organisation (CSO)”.

In the past decade, there has been a radical, worldwide change in the way Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) present themselves in the civil society, before the funding agencies and in various nationals and international fora. One significant change is that NGOs now call themselves CSOs, that is Civil Society Organisations. This change is replete with meaning, connotations and implications. And all these meanings and implications have proved crucial for the way CSOs have evolved over the past decade or so. (Mohanty, ‎2002) Continue reading “YUVA lobbies to change appellation of ‘NGO’ to ‘CSO’”

Why We Are Converting YLA Into a Social Enterprise

As austerity measures deepen, are big businesses unwittingly contributing to social injustice? If so, who will fill the gap they are leaving?

Recent political and financial events have seen businesses retrench, dig in and attempt to ride out the storm. To many, this suggests that the corporate world is being indifferent to its social responsibility. Community projects are being curtailed and cash donations to charities drying up. The impact can only be detrimental. Continue reading “Why We Are Converting YLA Into a Social Enterprise”

21 September 2015: International Day of Peace

Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. The General Assembly has declared this as a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples.

The theme of this year’s commemoration is “Partnerships for Peace – Dignity for All” which aims to highlight the importance of all segments of society to work together to strive for peace. The work of the United Nations would not be possible without the initial partnerships that were active in its creation and the thousands of partnerships each year between governments, civil society, the private sector, faith-based groups and other non-governmental organisations that are needed to support the Organisation in achieving its future goals.

The International Day of Peace was established in 1981 by resolution 36/67PDF document of the United Nations General Assembly to coincide with its opening session, which was held annually on the third Tuesday of September. The first Peace Day was observed in September 1982.

In 2001, the General Assembly by unanimous vote adopted resolution 55/282PDF document, which established 21 September as an annual day of non-violence and cease-fire.

The United Nations invites all nations and people to honour a cessation of hostilities during the Day, and to otherwise commemorate the Day through education and public awareness on issues related to peace.

Documents

General Assembly resolutions on the International Day of Peace:

Resources

Past Observances

International Day of Peace