Who Cares?

We have been taught all our lives that to be decent human beings means that we exist on this earth to (as far as we can) make life less difficult for others, and in turn, make them less difficult for us. To feel like we have a greater purpose and to feel like we are making a difference, we need to help our fellow human beings in any way we can.

This attitude is ideally also meant to extend to monitoring our behaviour so that our impact on nature and the world, in general, is as positive as possible. However, every day, the human race fails to inspire because the world has become such an incredibly harsh place to call home.

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MENA Regional Youth Advocacy Workshop on Global Citizenship Education (GCED)

The United Nations Secretary-General’s Global Education First Initiative (GEFI) will organize a MENA regional advocacy workshop on Global Citizenship Education (GCED) for young people from 12 to 16 December 2015 in Amman, Jordan.

Organized in partnership with the Generations For Peace, the workshop aims to build the capacity of dynamic young leaders from the MENA region to foster peace using the core components of GCED. The three-day advocacy training will build on the outcomes of the ‘Seminar on the Role of GCED in Fostering Youth Peace builders’, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York from 10-11 September 2015. At the Seminar, youth advocates, educators, experts, NGOs and international organizations explored the root causes and different forms of youth violence; identified aspects within GCED that could be used in preventing and building resilience to violence, hatred, intolerance and conflict; and learned from existing programmes around the world for prevention of conflict and violence targeting youth.

On 25 September 2015, world leaders gathered at the UN Summit for Sustainable Development and adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This workshop will provide participants with a global platform to discuss with other young leaders how to ensure the successful achievement of the  development goals for a more equal, just, prosperous and peaceful world by integrating concepts of GCED into peace-building practices at the local, national, regional and global levels.

Attending participants will be asked to identify specific aspects of GCED and advocacy, reflecting on the global challenges around violence and insecurity. Working both individually and in groups, the young people will expand on these topics, devising advocacy goals and strategies for use at local, national and regional levels. Participants will also engage in information sessions and workshops at the training to support them in this task, on areas such as ‘Advocacy tools to build strategies’, and ‘Bottom-up planning for advocacy campaigns’.

Approximately 50 participants, between the ages of 18 to 24, will be selected on the basis of their past/ongoing engagement and future commitment in educating youth at the local and national levels around GCED. Participants must have a minimum of two years’ experience in youth advocacy activities, an understanding of GCED issues and priorities, and a proven record of influencing change at the local or national levels.

Applications (in English or Arabic) for the Youth Advocacy Training must be received by 30 October 2015 (Midnight, EST), and successful applicants will be notified on 6 November 2015 (EST). Travel and local expenses will be covered for all successful applicants. This Workshop is supported by the Educate A Child.

Choosing my Avatar: Master or slave?

YUVA together with Judy Johnson is organising a workshop on the 3rd October 2015 under the theme: Choosing my Avatar: Master or slave? This conference will be held at Brahma Kumaris Centre, Global Peace House in Khoyrati as from 12.30 p.m to 4.30 p.m.

Judy Johnson, consultant and coach in the field of leadership development and organizational effectiveness from Canada invites you all to join her for a workshop that will help you to better choose you Avatar. YUVA is collaborating with her as it will benefit all our youngsters in exploring the ways and means to go beyond all your limitations and barriers in achieving excellence in life.

Judy works in the field of organizational effectiveness and leadership development. With a background in adult education, intercultural effectiveness, leadership and team development, she specialises in facilitating clarity in complex organizational and group situations. She assists in uncovering the inherent strengths in organizations and individuals, enhancing their ability to create and sustain focused, purposeful and positive directions.

Judy is adept in the areas of process facilitation, team development, principled negotiation, conflict resolution, experiential education design and delivery, needs assessment and program evaluation. She works with government, private sector and community-based programs and organizations in international and intercultural settings. Listed are examples of recent projects.

Judy has the ability to select and blend appropriate process tools to create clarity in groups, focus the will of the group in a common direction and enhance relationships and commitment to a collective endeavour. Through the use of silence, teaming strategies, reflective inquiry, and experiential activities, Judy uses an appreciative inquiry approach to facilitate strategic planning, teambuilding and conflict resolution retreats to strengthen organizational and group effectiveness. She facilitates consensus-building gatherings between multiple stakeholders in diverse contexts.

She has also been working directly with leaders at all levels of organizations in a one on one basis to support values-based leadership approach. In the coaching role, she acts as a sounding board and mirror to support and challenge assumptions guiding leadership approaches. In a facilitator role she works with leadership teams and/or develops programs to enhance leadership within the organization. She brings a perspective rooted in the principle that it is individual change that creates systems change and recognition that when leaders are focused on a purpose greater than profit or products will their organizations thrive.

Judy has designed and facilitated intercultural effectiveness orientation and debriefing sessions for Canadians travelling overseas as CIDA-sponsored professionals. Based on her own overseas project management work in India, Latin America and Southeast Asia, she also brings the intercultural effectiveness paradigm and approach to her work with interdisciplinary healthcare teams who cross professional cultures to work more effectively together. The principles guiding her approach to these sessions include a focus on self-awareness and self-mastery, intercultural awareness, and project management strategies.

We invite all young people to come and visit us on the 3rd of October 2015 for a very inspiring moment on how to be a good leader.

Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD study – developing Commonwealth country citizens

Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD study in the UK are offered for citizens of developing Commonwealth countries. These scholarships are funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), with the aim of contributing to the UK’s international development aims and wider overseas interests, supporting excellence in UK higher education, and sustaining the principles of the Commonwealth. For information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit our Apply page.

You can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship for the following levels of study:

  • Master’s (one-year courses only)
  • PhD

All subject areas are eligible, although the CSC’s selection criteria give priority to applications that demonstrate the strongest relevance to development.

You should apply to study at a UK university with which the CSC has a part funding agreement. Click here for a list of UK universities which have part funding agreements with the CSC

Eligibility

To apply for these scholarships, you must:

  • Be a Commonwealth citizen, refugee, or British protected person
  • Be permanently resident in a developing Commonwealth country
  • Be available to start your academic studies in the UK by the start of the UK academic year in September/October 2016
  • By October 2016, hold a first degree of at least upper second class (2:1) honours standard, or a second class degree and a relevant postgraduate qualification (usually a Master’s degree)

The CSC promotes equal opportunity, gender equity, and cultural exchange. Applications are encouraged from a diverse range of candidates. The CSC is committed to administering and managing its scholarships and fellowships in a fair and transparent manner – for more information, see the CSC anti-fraud policy.

Terms and conditions

For full terms and conditions, see the Commonwealth Scholarships 2016 prospectus

Selection process

Each year, the CSC invites selected nominating bodies to submit a specific number of nominations. The deadline for nominating bodies to submit nominations to the CSC is 17 December 2015.

The CSC invites around three times more nominations than scholarships available – therefore, nominated candidates are not guaranteed to be awarded a scholarship. There are no quotas for scholarships for any individual country. Candidates nominated by national nominating agencies are in competition with those nominated by other nominating bodies, and the same standards will be applied to applications made through either channel.

Each nominated candidate’s application is first considered by a member of the CSC’s panel of advisers with expertise in the subject area concerned, and then by the CSC’s selection committee in competition with other candidates.

Applications are considered according to the following selection criteria:

  • Academic merit of the candidate
  • Quality of the proposal
  • Potential impact of the work on the development of the candidate’s home country

For further details, see the Selection criteria for 2016 Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD study

You may also find the Feedback for unsuccessful candidates useful.

How to apply

You must apply to one of the following nominating bodies in the first instance – the CSC does not accept direct applications for these scholarships:

All applications must be made through your nominating body in your home country. Each nominating body is responsible for its own selection process. You must check with your nominating body for their specific advice and rules for applying, and for their own closing date for applications. The CSC does not impose any age limit on applicants, but nominating bodies may do so in line with their own priorities.

You must make your application using the CSC’s Electronic Application System (EAS). Click here for full information on how to use the EAS, including detailed guides.

Your application must be submitted to and endorsed by one of the approved nominating bodies listed above. The CSC will not accept any applications that are not submitted via the EAS to a nominating body in your home country.

All applications must be submitted by 23.59 (GMT) on 19 November 2015 at the latest. Please note that this is an earlier deadline than in previous years