YUVA wins ‘SADC Gender Protocol at Work 2019’ Award in the Youth Category

YUVA won the first prize for the Voice and Choice – SADC Gender Protocol @ Work Summit 2019 in the Youth category in recognition of its outstanding efforts in championing the Post-2015 SADC Gender Protocol and Sustainable Development Goals, and will be representing Mauritius at the regional summit to be held in South Africa in November 2019. 

YUVA was invited by Gender Links to participate in the Voice and Choice – SADC Gender Protocol @ Work Summit 2019, held on Friday, 31 May 2019 at the Gold Crest Hotel, in Quatre Bornes, to showcase its work and activities for the year 2018 – 2019 targeting the YOUTH.  

Continue reading “YUVA wins ‘SADC Gender Protocol at Work 2019’ Award in the Youth Category”

YUVA at the African Women in Dialogue (AWID) 2018, Johannesburg

YUVA has the pleasure to announce that it will be participating in a 1-week forum organised by Gender Links in collaborations with the Zanele Mbeki Development (ZMDT) entitled African Women in Dialogue (AWID) from 19 to 23 November 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa. YUVA will be represented by Ms Soveeta Chengappa Naidu, executive member of YUVA.

The aim of the workshop is to bring together women from the African continent, particularly the SADC region to participate in a dialogue in regards to the situation of women locally and regionally. The theme of the forum is “Strengthening the African Women’s Movement within the Fourth Industrial Revolution towards a new and value-based eco-system” and it arises from the recognition that most women are not familiar with the concept of this revolution. Continue reading “YUVA at the African Women in Dialogue (AWID) 2018, Johannesburg”

Achieving Gender Equity for Sustainable Development through Environmental Adult Education in Mauritius

Report prepared by Christiana Uzoaru Okorie, YUVA Project Writer

Introduction

In Africa and some parts of the world, gender stereotypes inherent in the culture of the people, defines women and men in opposite ways, create limitations to both women and men and legitimise unequal power relation. Gender stereotyping refers to the way in which a society expects women and men to behave and the specific roles women and men are expected to play the society. This cultural phenomenon has resulted in gender inequity in most African societies and contributed to non-attainment of sustainable development. Gender inequity inherent in society is a denial of Human Rights and is of great concern to sustainable development. Continue reading “Achieving Gender Equity for Sustainable Development through Environmental Adult Education in Mauritius”

YUVA: Runner-up of “Best Practice Award – Economic Justice”

On the invitation of Gender Links (Mauritius), YUVA participated in the “SADC Protocol @ Work and Sustainable Development Goal Mini-Summits” at the Regional Training Centre of MACOSS, Moka.

Adopted in 2008, the SADC Gender Protocol is a unique sub-regional instrument for promoting gender equality that brings together regional, continental and global commitments to gender equality in one instrument, with an initial alignment to the Millennium Development Goals that expired in 2015. Continue reading “YUVA: Runner-up of “Best Practice Award – Economic Justice””

This House believes that housewives should be paid for their work: MYP

YUVA is organising the Session 5 of the Mauritius Youth Parliament on the theme “This House believes that housewives should be paid for their work” with YUVANs, secondary school students, university students, government officials, NGO representatives and personalities from the corporate sector as participants.

In this context, YUVA invites you as participant on Thursday 4 May 2017, from 09:00hr to noon at the Municipality of Port Louis.

Continue reading “This House believes that housewives should be paid for their work: MYP”

8 March: International Women’s Day

The 2016 theme for International Women’s Day is “Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality”.

International Women’s Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

The idea of this theme is to consider how to accelerate the 2030 Agenda, building momentum for the effective implementation of the new Sustainable Development Goals, especially goal number 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls; and number 4: Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning. The theme will also focus on new commitments under UN Women’s Step It Up initiative, and other existing commitments on gender equality, women’s empowerment and women’s human rights.

Some key targets of the 2030 Agenda:

  • By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and Goal-4 effective learning outcomes.
  • By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and preprimary education so that they are ready for primary education.
  • End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
  • Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.
  • Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation.

Introduction

International Women’s Day is celebrated in many countries around the world. It is a day when women are recognized for their achievements without regard to divisions, whether national, ethnic, linguistic, cultural, economic or political. International Women’s Day first emerged from the activities of labour movements at the turn of the twentieth century in North America and across Europe.

Since those early years, International Women’s Day has assumed a new global dimension for women in developed and developing countries alike. The growing international women’s movement, which has been strengthened by four global United Nations women’s conferences, has helped make the commemoration a rallying point to build support for women’s rights and participation in the political and economic arenas.

Chronology

  • 1909   The first National Woman’s Day was observed in the United States on 28 February. The Socialist Party of America designated this day in honour of the 1908 garment workers’ strike in New York, where women protested against working conditions.
  • 1910   The Socialist International, meeting in Copenhagen, established a Women’s Day, international in character, to honour the movement for women’s rights and to build support for achieving universal suffrage for women. The proposal was greeted with unanimous approval by the conference of over 100 women from 17 countries, which included the first three women elected to the Finnish Parliament. No fixed date was selected for the observance.
  • 1911   As a result of the Copenhagen initiative, International Women’s Day was marked for the first time (19 March) in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland, where more than one million women and men attended rallies. In addition to the right to vote and to hold public office, they demanded women’s rights to work, to vocational training and to an end to discrimination on the job.
  • 1913-1914   International Women’s Day also became a mechanism for protesting World War I. As part of the peace movement, Russian women observed their first International Women’s Day on the last Sunday in February. Elsewhere in Europe, on or around 8 March of the following year, women held rallies either to protest the war or to express solidarity with other activists.
  • 1917   Against the backdrop of the war, women in Russia again chose to protest and strike for “Bread and Peace” on the last Sunday in February (which fell on 8 March on the Gregorian calendar). Four days later, the Czar abdicated and the provisional Government granted women the right to vote.
  • 1975 During International Women’s Year, the United Nations began celebrating International Women’s Day on 8 March.
  • 1995 The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, a historic roadmap signed by 189 governments, focused on 12 critical areas of concern, and envisioned a world where each woman and girl can exercise her choices, such as participating in politics, getting an education, having an income, and living in societies free from violence and discrimination.
  • 2014 The 58th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW58) – the annual gathering of States to address critical issues related to gender equality and women’s rights — focused on “Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals for women and girls”. UN entities and accredited NGOs from around the world took stock of progress and remaining challenges towards meeting the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs have played an important role in galvanizing attention on and resources for gender equality and women’s empowerment.

The UN and Gender Equality

The Charter of the United Nations, signed in 1945, was the first international agreement to affirm the principle of equality between women and men. Since then, the UN has helped create a historic legacy of internationally-agreed strategies, standards, programmes and goals to advance the status of women worldwide.

Over the years, the UN and its technical agencies have promoted the participation of women as equal partners with men in achieving sustainable development, peace, security, and full respect for human rights. The empowerment of women continues to be a central feature of the UN’s efforts to address social, economic and political challenges across the globe.