18 July: Nelson Mandela International Day Celebrated in Mauritius

We celebrate Nelson Mandela International Day every year to shine light on the legacy of a man who changed the 20th century and helped shape the 21st.

This is a moment for all to renew with the values that inspired Nelson Mandela. Absolute determination. A deep commitment to justice, human rights and fundamental freedoms. A profound belief in the equality and dignity of every woman and man. A relentless engagement for dialogue and solidarity across all lines and divisions. Nelson Mandela was a great statesman, a fierce advocate for equality, the founding father of peace in South Africa.

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Do you want to volunteer for Maha Shivaratri 2019? Register today!

It is with great pleasure that YUVA wishes to announce that, in collaboration with other organisations, we will be conducting free food distribution on a full-time basis from the 1st to the 4th of March 2019 at Grand Bassin on the occasion of Maha Shivaratri.

Last year YUVA served 250000+ puris, 100000+ juice cups & 25000+ biryani plates for Maha Shivaratri. We’ll live this spirit again!

For any further query, please contact our Programme Coordinator, Roopshika at 2181732.

Continue reading “Do you want to volunteer for Maha Shivaratri 2019? Register today!”

21 April: World Creativity and Innovation Day

In its resolution A/RES/71/284, the General Assembly called for international recognition of April 21 as World Creativity and Innovation Day; a day to raise awareness of the role of creativity and innovation in problem-solving and by extension, in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals. More than 80 countries joined in support of the resolution. Continue reading “21 April: World Creativity and Innovation Day”

20 February: World Day of Social Justice

Social justice is an underlying principle for peaceful and prosperous coexistence within and among nations. We uphold the principles of social justice when we promote gender equality or the rights of indigenous peoples and migrants. We advance social justice when we remove barriers that people face because of gender, age, race, ethnicity, religion, culture or disability.

For the United Nations, the pursuit of social justice for all is at the core of our global mission to promote development and human dignity. The adoption by the International Labour Organization of the Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization is just one recent example of the UN system’s commitment to social justice. The Declaration focuses on guaranteeing fair outcomes for all through employment, social protection, social dialogue, and fundamental principles and rights at work.

The General Assembly proclaimed 20 February as World Day of Social Justice in 2007, inviting Member States to devote the day to promoting national activities in accordance with the objectives and goals of the World Summit for Social Development and the twenty-fourth session of the General Assembly. Observance of World Day of Social Justice should support efforts of the international community in poverty eradication, the promotion of full employment and decent work, gender equity and access to social well-being and justice for all.

New Vision for the Economy

The world has changed dramatically. We no longer live in a world relatively empty of humans and their artifacts. We now live in the “Anthropocene era” in a full world where humans are dramatically altering their ecological life-support systems. Our traditional economic concepts and models were developed in an empty world. If we are to create sustainable prosperity, if we seek “improved human well-being and social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risk and ecological scarcities,” we are going to need a new vision of the economy and its relationship to the rest of the world that’s better adapted to the new conditions we face.

We are going to need an economics that respects planetary boundaries, that recontinues the dependence of human well-being on social relations and fairness, and that recognises that the ultimate goal is real, sustainable human well-being , not merely growth of material consumption.

The new economics recognises that the economy is embedded in a society and culture that are themselves embedded in an ecological life-support system, and that the economy can’t grow forever on this finite planet.

Guidelines for a Just Transition

Background

The International Labour Organization unanimously adopted the ILO Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization on 10 June 2008. This is the third major statement of principles and policies adopted by the International Labour Conference since the ILO’s Constitution of 1919. It builds on the Philadelphia Declaration of 1944 and the Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work of 1998. The 2008 Declaration expresses the contemporary vision of the ILO’s mandate in the era of globalization.

This landmark Declaration is a powerful reaffirmation of ILO values. It is the outcome of tripartite consultations that started in the wake of the Report of the World Commission on the Social Dimension of Globalization. By adopting this text, the representatives of governments, employers’ and workers’ organizations from 182 member States emphasize the key role of our tripartite Organization in helping to achieve progress and social justice in the context of globalization. Together, they commit to enhance the ILO’s capacity to advance these goals, through the Decent Work Agenda. The Declaration institutionalizes the Decent Work concept developed by the ILO since 1999, placing it at the core of the Organization’s policies to reach its constitutional objectives.

The Declaration comes at a crucial political moment, reflecting the wide consensus on the need for a strong social dimension to globalization in achieving improved and fair outcomes for all. It constitutes a compass for the promotion of a fair globalization based on Decent Work, as well as a practical tool to accelerate progress in the implementation of the Decent Work Agenda at the country level. It also reflects a productive outlook by highlighting the importance of sustainable enterprises in creating greater employment and income opportunities for all.

The General Assembly Recognizes that social development and social justice are indispensable for the achievement and maintenance of peace and security within and among nations and that, in turn, social development and social justice cannot be attained in the absence of peace and security or in the absence of respect for all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

It further recognizes that globalization and interdependence are opening new opportunities through trade, investment and capital flows and advances in technology, including information technology, for the growth of the world economy and the development and improvement of living standards around the world, while at the same time there remain serious challenges, including serious financial crises, insecurity, poverty, exclusion and inequality within and among societies and considerable obstacles to further integration and full participation in the global economy for developing countries as well as some countries with economies in transition.

On 26 November 2007, the General Assembly declared that, starting from the sixty-third session of the General Assembly, 20 February will be celebrated annually as the World Day of Social Justice.

Source: UN, 2017

The Queen’s Commonwealth Essay Competition

The Queen’s Commonwealth Essay Competition 2016 is now open for entries; submissions can be made until 1st May 2016.

The overarching theme for 2016 is ‘An Inclusive Commonwealth’, which is also the 2016 Commonwealth Year theme, and a topical theme for today’s youth. Both Senior and Junior topics give young people the opportunity to think about aspects of the theme such as: the significance of community; the importance of diversity and difference; the question of belonging; the values of tolerance, respect and understanding; and the sense of shared responsibility that exists within the Commonwealth today. The topics are a chance to develop critical thinking and to express views in a creative manner.

Read the Senior and Junior topics.

For more information about the competition, please visit Terms and Conditions and Frequently Asked Questions.

Information on how to submit an essay can be found here.

Open to all Commonwealth citizens aged 18 and under, our essay competition offers young people from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to make their voices heard on a global platform, to engage with issues important to them and to express their aspirations for the future. Each year, participants demonstrate their ability to stimulate and provoke discussions about important Commonwealth and global issues from a young person’s perspective and to showcase their critical and creative skills.

History of the Essay Competition

The RCS has a rich history of nurturing the creative talents of young people around the Commonwealth. We endeavour to promote literacy, expression and creativity among young people by celebrating excellence and imagination. Run by the RCS since 1883, this international schools’ writing contest – the world’s oldest and largest – is a highly regarded and popular international education project which we run in partnership with Cambridge University Press.

In 2015, the contest was renamed ‘The Queen’s Commonwealth Essay Competition’, in honour of HM Queen Elizabeth II’s role as both Head of the Commonwealth and Patron of the Royal Commonwealth Society.

Read about the 2015 winners.

YUVA souhaite une bonne fête de l’Eid-al-Adha à tous les musulmans

Alors que la semaine dernière nous avons fêté le Ganesh Chaturti, les musulmans, eux, célébreront l’Eid-al-Adha, aussi connue comme Bakr-Eid, ce jeudi 24 septembre 2015.

L’Eid-al-Adha aussi connu comme Bakr-Eid est célébrée le 10e jour du dernier mois du calendrier islamique, Dhu al-Hijjah. Les musulmans célèbre cette fête pour commémorer le jour où Abraham a accepté de sacrifier la vie de son fils sous l’ordre de Dieu. Ce dernier voulant le mettre à l’épreuve a cependant substitué son fils Ismaël par un mouton à la dernière minute. Tous les ans, les musulmans célèbrent ainsi l’Eid-al-Adha en souvenir de la soumission d’Abraham à la volonté de Dieu.

L’Eid-al-Adha marque également la fin du pèlerinage à la Mecque. Le Hadj est le cinquième pilier de l’Islam, les quatre précédents étant (i) la « shahada » — la foi dans l’unicité de Dieu et de la prophétie du prophète Mahomet (pssl) ; (ii) la « swalaat » — les cinq prières quotidiennes ; (iii) le « saum », le jeûne du mois du Ramadan ; et (iv) la « zakat », l’aumône aux pauvres .Pour cette occasion, les musulmans devront procéder au « Qurbani » ce qui est de sacrifier un bœuf. Rituel qui se déroule en présence de religieux, entre autres, car l’abattage doit être fait selon les règles islamiques précises. Les célébrations se poursuivront autour d’un bon briani entre familles et amis. Il est à noter que la viande du bœuf est reparti en 3 parts : une pour le musulman et les siens, une autre pour les proches et membres de la famille et la dernière qui sera distribuée aux pauvres et démunis de la communauté.

Cette fête qui est plus qu’un simple événement religieux est l’occasion pour se rencontrer avec la famille et les proches, elle est aussi synonyme de partage et de générosité envers les pauvres et les nécessiteux.

Tous les YUVANs se rejoignent pour souhaiter à tous les musulmans une bonne fête de l’Eid-al-Adha.