1 December: World AIDS Day

World AIDS Day is celebrated around the world on December 1st each year. It has become one of the most recognized international health days and a key opportunity to raise awareness, commemorate those who have passed on, and celebrate victories, such as increased access to treatment and prevention services.

UNAIDS took the lead on campaigning for World AIDS Day from its creation until 2004. From 2004 onwards the World AIDS Campaign’s Global Steering Committee began selecting a theme for World AIDS Day in consultation with civil society, organisations and government agencies involved in the AIDS response.

Themes run for one or two years and are not just specific to World AIDS Day. Campaigning slogans such as ‘Stop AIDS. Keep the Promise’ have been used year-round to hold governments accountable for their HIV and AIDS related commitments.

2016 Theme: HANDS UP FOR #HIVPREVENTION

In the lead-up to World AIDS Day 2016, the hands up for #HIVprevention campaign will explore different aspects of HIV prevention and how they relate to specific groups of people, such as adolescent girls and young women, key populations and people living with HIV.

A new report by UNAIDS Get on the Fast-Track: the life-cycle approach to HIV shows that countries are getting on the Fast-Track, with an additional one million people accessing treatment in just six months (January to June 2016). By June 2016, around 18.2 million [16.1 million–19.0 million] people had access to the life-saving medicines, including 910 000 children, double the number five years earlier. If these efforts are sustained and increased, the world will be on track to achieve the target of 30 million people on treatment by 2020.

The report was launched on 21 November 2016 in Windhoek, Namibia, by the President of Namibia, Hage Geingob and the Executive Director of UNAIDS, Michel Sidibé.

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GLOBAL HIV STATISTICS

  • 18.2 million [16.1 million–19.0 million] people were accessing antiretroviral therapy (June 2016)
  • 36.7 million [34.0 million–39.8 million] people globally were living with HIV (end 2015)
  • 2.1 million [1.8 million–2.4 million] people became newly infected with HIV (end 2015)
  • 1.1 million [940 000–1.3 million] people died from AIDS-related illnesses (end 2015)
  • 78 million [69.5 million–87.6 million] people have become infected with HIV since the start of the epidemic (end 2015)
  • 35 million [29.6 million–40.8 million] people have died from AIDS-related illnesses since the start of the epidemic (end 2015)

People living with HIV

  • In 2015, there were 36.7 million [34.0 million–39.8 million] people living with HIV.

UNAIDS World AIDS Day event – Moving forward together: leaving no one behind

UNAIDS will host a special event on 30 November 2016 to commemorate World AIDS Day and the commitment to move forward together to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Websites of Previous Observances:

Source: UN, 2016
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YUVA

Registered in February 2015, YUVA started as a group of enthusiastic individuals, and today it has mobilised thousands of young people with a simple aim of creating a better future for children and youth of Mauritius. At the heart of YUVA’s duty lies the conviction that the collective destinies of the human race are bound together.

One thought on “1 December: World AIDS Day

  1. I think, this world needs viruses like Aids or Zika. Let me try to explain.

    Currently we have approximately 7.5 billion people worldwide. And the population is still growing. Have a look at https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/3a/Human_population_growth_from_1800_to_2000.png

    Overpopulation causes a lot of problems: deforestation, mass extinction of animal species, increasing food prices, need for genetically modified food, by 2050 lack of food, mass migrations, air and water pollution, global warming and climate change, increasing crime rates and wars, increased emergence of new epidemics and pandemics, and so on.

    Viruses like Aids or Zika help to slow down the growth of the world population. Without such viruses we would already have much more people on Earth. And of course we would have more problems.

    We should try to reduce the world population. Some countries in Africa and Asia have already recognized this problem and try to solve it with mass abortions, laws and financial incentives. I am ready to help.

    Like

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